Sat.Nov 21, 2020

The Scrum Framework, Illustrated

Scrum.org

With the launch of the new Scrum Guide, we also created a new illustration of the Scrum framework.

SCRUM 269

Making Postgres stored procedures 9X faster in Citus

The Citus Data

Stored procedures are widely used in commercial relational databases. You write most of your application logic in PL/SQL and achieve notable performance gains by pushing this logic into the database.

Azure 93
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2020 Scrum Guide: Definition of Done Created By Scrum Team

Scrum.org

In the 2020 Scrum Guide, the Definition of Done is created by the Scrum Team. In previous versions of the Scrum Guide, this responsibility was explicitly owned by the Development Team. I will explain the intention of the change and what it means for Scrum Teams.

SCRUM 168

EU Competition Complaints Against Amazon: No Big Deal?

CEO Insider

Big Tech is moving into the antitrust gunsights again. For Amazon, the first shot across the bow has come for the EU in the form of two complaints alleging anticompetitive behavior by Amazon. The first complaint, in July 2020, focused on the Buy Box, a key component of the Amazon ecosystem.

71

Building Evolvable Architectures

Speaker: Dr. Rebecca Parsons, CTO of ThoughtWorks

The software development ecosystem exists in a state of dynamic equilibrium, where any new tool, framework, or technique leads to disruption and the establishment of a new equilibrium. Predictability is impossible when the foundation architects plan against is constantly changing in unexpected ways. It’s no surprise many CIOs and CTOs are struggling to adapt, in part because their architecture isn’t equipped to evolve. This webinar will discuss what’s at stake if companies continue to use long term architecture plans.

This Week in Programming: Where Open Source Ends and Free Support Begins

The New Stack

This week, we bring to you the tale of a lone open source developer by the name of Patrick Ahlbrecht who dared to stand up and declare to the world that, “no, ‘open source’ does not mean ‘includes free support'” and then, when many responded in various expected ways, again reiterated his (to some indefensible) position.